Shame and Wonder: Essays

Books 773 Comment
Again by BlurbsIn my mind the only activity better than abandoning the reading of this book would be me writing about the whys and wherefores of my sudde

http://msarki.tumblr.com/post/1457652...Burned Again by BlurbsIn my mind the only activity better than abandoning the reading of this book would be me writing about the whys and wherefores of my sudden flight. In addition, of course, I am factoring in the fight quotient as rarely do I have nothing left to say in any thoughtful argument. Shame and Wonder by David Searcy did begin with some promise with the very first essay collected here. And it happened, as the story goes, to be the first one he ever wrote. But from then on it was tiresome reading about this vastness of space, his cerebral idiosyncrasies, his girlfriend Nancy and her sketchbook with no previous frame of reference for where she even came from. I’d like to think his ex-wife better fodder. But I do I love a great personality entering the picture. The problem with putting yourself and loved ones into your work however is the risk that nobody will like you. Or too many will find your character a bit too much for embarking on a book-length relationship. I am already pretty sure I do not like David, or his girlfriend Nancy, and even if a few essays down the road there would have been a chance I might find something redeeming in them both is simply not in the cards for me. I am already reading Writing Dangerously: Mary McCarthy And Her World, a painfully boring autobiography about Mary McCarthy, and I intend on finishing it even it it damages me permanently. I also have Don Quixote going at the same time and it is proving to be a bit unbelievable and too silly of a knight-errant adventure for me. But reading the essays by Searcy was supposed to be fun and interesting. He had been compared by his blurb-writing buddies to Geoff Dyer, John Jeremiah Sullivan, and quite ludicrously even the name of W. G. Sebald was evoked to my now-unforgiving consternation resulting in this literary diatribe. I am so exhausted by these jacket blurbs lying to us and promising works that have little chance of succeeding their lofty ideals. They must think we’re stupid readers and want to believe anything, and often I expect they are right. Always, I am seriously looking for an essayist like Geoff Dyer. Hell, I even look for Geoff Dyer in Geoff Dyer because these days I feel even he has gone missing in most of his latest work. But to invoke Sebald in a wish to sell more copies to us fools has gone a bit too far in my estimation. The only relationship I can find to W.G. Sebald is Searcy’s position on my book shelf sitting right beside him. At least until I can get the damn thing sold. Chances are another fool, like me, is born. A viral Shame and Wonder: Essays Author David Searcy are Book For fans of John Jeremiah Sullivan, Leslie Jamison, Geoff Dyer, and W G Sebald, the twenty one essays in David Searcy s debut collection are captivating, daring and completely unlike anything else you ve read before Forging connections between the sublime and the mundane, this is a work of true grace, wisdom, and joy Expansive in scope but deeply personal in perspectiFor fans of John Jeremiah Sullivan, Leslie Jamison, Geoff Dyer, and W G Sebald, the twenty one essays in David Searcy s debut collection are captivating, daring and completely unlike anything else you ve read before Forging connections between the sublime and the mundane, this is a work of true grace, wisdom, and joy Expansive in scope but deeply personal in perspective, the pieces in Shame and Wonder are born of a vast and abiding curiosity, one that has led Searcy into some strange and beautiful territory, where old Uncle Scrooge comic books reveal profound truths, and the vastness of space becomes an expression of pure love Whether ruminating on an old El Camino pickup truck, those magical prizes lurking in the cereal boxes of our youth, or a lurid online ad for Sexy Girls Near Dallas, Searcy brings his unique blend of affection and suspicion to the everyday wonders that surround and seduce us In Nameless, he ruminates on spirituality and the fate of an unknown tightrope walker who falls to his death in Texas in the 1880s, buried as a local legend but without a given name The Hudson River School weaves together Google Maps, classical art, and dental hygiene into a story that explores with exquisite humor and grace the seemingly impossible angles at which our lives often intersect And in An Enchanted Tree Near Fredericksburg, countless lovers carve countless hearts into the gnarled trunk of an ancient oak tree, leaving their marks to be healed, lifted upward, and, finally, absorbed Haunting, hilarious, and full of longing, Shame and Wonder announces the arrival of David Searcy as an essential and surprising new voice in American writing Advance praise for Shame and Wonder Strange, wonderful, and full of curiosity and nostalgia, David Searcy s essays chip away at the world around us to lay bare the beauty and sadness at the heart of it all Gay Talese Shame and Wonder is a work of genius a very particular kind of genius, to be sure, one that bides comfortably with questions, potentialities, mysteries, and wonders than with the hard and fast answers that the information age has taught us to crave How rare it is these days to commit oneself to uncertainty, but when it s done as David Searcy does it gently, insistently, ever alert to all shades of the slapstick and tragic the inquiry itself becomes the revelation, an object lesson in what it means to be human If you want to know things, real things, read Shame and Wonder It will knock you flat and lift you up Ben Fountain, author of Billy Lynn s Long Halftime Walk David Searcy reminds us what voice means and why it s useful We can hear something here, something achieved and distinctive A writer has figured out how to bring the style of his prose into near perfect alignment with his habit of mind, and to trust the impulses of his curiosity in such a way that we seem to experience not effort but flowing thought John Jeremiah Sullivan, author of Pulphead Reading David Searcy isn t like reading anyone else His voice is weird and it s smart and it s right here, oddly close, paying attention to cereal prizes and possums to the loneliness of new bedrooms and the miraculous slow fade of hearts etched into bark Searcy probes moments that pulse with secret electricity Leslie Jamison, author of The Empathy Exams. David Searcy Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Shame and Wonder: Essays book, this is one of the most wanted David Searcy author readers around the world. . Good Ebook Shame and Wonder: Essays http://msarki.tumblr.com/post/1457652...Burned Again by BlurbsIn my mind the only activity better than abandoning the reading of this book would be me writing about the whys and wherefores of my sudden flight. In addition, of course, I am factoring in the fight quotient as rarely do I have nothing left to say in any thoughtful argument. Shame and Wonder by David Searcy did begin with some promise with the very first essay collected here. And it happened, as the story goes, to be the first one he ever wrote. But from then on it was tiresome reading about this vastness of space, his cerebral idiosyncrasies, his girlfriend Nancy and her sketchbook with no previous frame of reference for where she even came from. I’d like to think his ex-wife better fodder. But I do I love a great personality entering the picture. The problem with putting yourself and loved ones into your work however is the risk that nobody will like you. Or too many will find your character a bit too much for embarking on a book-length relationship. I am already pretty sure I do not like David, or his girlfriend Nancy, and even if a few essays down the road there would have been a chance I might find something redeeming in them both is simply not in the cards for me. I am already reading Writing Dangerously: Mary McCarthy And Her World, a painfully boring autobiography about Mary McCarthy, and I intend on finishing it even it it damages me permanently. I also have Don Quixote going at the same time and it is proving to be a bit unbelievable and too silly of a knight-errant adventure for me. But reading the essays by Searcy was supposed to be fun and interesting. He had been compared by his blurb-writing buddies to Geoff Dyer, John Jeremiah Sullivan, and quite ludicrously even the name of W. G. Sebald was evoked to my now-unforgiving consternation resulting in this literary diatribe. I am so exhausted by these jacket blurbs lying to us and promising works that have little chance of succeeding their lofty ideals. They must think we’re stupid readers and want to believe anything, and often I expect they are right. Always, I am seriously looking for an essayist like Geoff Dyer. Hell, I even look for Geoff Dyer in Geoff Dyer because these days I feel even he has gone missing in most of his latest work. But to invoke Sebald in a wish to sell more copies to us fools has gone a bit too far in my estimation. The only relationship I can find to W.G. Sebald is Searcy’s position on my book shelf sitting right beside him. At least until I can get the damn thing sold. Chances are another fool, like me, is born.

About Author

  • David Searcy Post author

    David Searcy Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Shame and Wonder: Essays book, this is one of the most wanted David Searcy author readers around the world.

One thought on “Shame and Wonder: Essays

  • msarki.tumblr post 1457652Burned Again by BlurbsIn my mind the only activity better than abandoning the reading of this book would be me writing about the whys and wherefores of my sudden flight In addition, of course, I am factoring in the fight quotient as rarely do I have nothing left to say in any thoughtful argument Shame and Wonder by David Searcy did begin with some promise with the very first essay collected here And it happened, as the story goes, to be the first one he ever wrote But f [...]


  • So extraordinarily sensitive to meaning yet transparent to it, I suspect profundities passed through us all the time We knew all sorts of deep, important things but only very briefly What I d like to know is what might be required to get it back from an essay ostensibly about, of all things, breakfast cereal.I d never heard of David Searcy before, and ended up reading this pretty much by accident, but it s a perfect fit for the part of me that finds an endless, wistful fascination in the notion [...]


  • David Searcy is apparently well known for his two horror inflected novels, Ordinary Horror and Last Things , Google him and the matches you get are all for Shame and Wonder, I m starting to get that uneasy feeling, the publicists are doing a great job with very ordinary material Here s the publisher s blurb Like dispatches from another world, the twenty one essays in David Searcy s debut collection Shame and Wonder are unfamiliar, profound and haunting In his late sixties, the Texan author David [...]


  • but you know how, when something s wrecked, you kind of see it from a distance, see right past it toward what could have been and might be yet if you just take your time, don t try to rush it in such circumstances one can glimpse perfection a collection of twenty one essays from novelist david searcy, shame and wonder covers an impressively wide range of subjects, but its salient feature is an entrancing command of language searcy s prose, handsome and undulating, could make even the most seemin [...]


  • Aside from the second essay, this book was a waste of time It s a series of essays of continuous rambling about the author s experiences If the book accomplishes anything, it s to teach hopeful writers that to get crappy material noticed, all you need is a savvy PR person on your side I say this because the book has caught the attention of media giants, although it s nothing to make a big deal over.



  • Well, I can t say I m glad I read this I found the author s writing style tough to follow The subjects of each essay were difficult for me to locate and follow The sentence structures were impressive, but long and difficult for me to put together with what the author was communicating I made it all the way through, but I m not sure at all what I gained from it.


  • If I wrote anything like this as a reflective essay I would fail due to being meandering, purposeless, unengaging and weirdly narcisstic This is nearly as bad as the stuff I had to read for year 12 English.


  • Shame and Wonder by David Searcy is a highly recommended collection of twenty one essays that seek connections between wildly different things and ideas.In this well written collection, Searcy discovers connections between wildly different subjects and while recalling past events He is observant, honest, and engaging as he shares his recollections and his often meandering thoughts that are all somehow now interconnected with the event or memory Many of these essays bring to mind a discussion bet [...]


  • The literary essay is a minority pursuit that probably ranks somewhere below short stories and poetry, but just above flash fiction Nevertheless, David Searcy is a brave practitioner of the craft.Searcy exemplifies the line, however wavering, between the modern essay and other forms of nonfiction, such as feature articles or essay reviews Like Montaigne, the progenitor of the modern essay, Searcy is first and foremost interested in the workings of his own mind when he makes a connection, however [...]


  • As any collection of shorter works is bound to be, this is a very uneven book, and you need to achieve certain state of zen to really grasp some of the most tenuous connections and wanderings of the mind You feel like a pebble skipping on the surface of the lake sometimes just skimming with no connection, but sometimes plunging so deep that it takes you breath away Same with these essays I absolutely loved some of them Santa in Anatolia is wonderful, occasionally meditative especially the descri [...]


  • This is an exceptional collection of writings almost meditations and mental journeying through time and place than essays Something about the term essays makes me think of crackers without liquid I liked the entire book But I will mention just a few bits My favorite passage was about climbing Enchanted Rock He revisits the experience in a different essay and that also is quite good I liked the writing entitled Didelphis Nuncius which I thought should have been called Playing Possum but that pro [...]


  • 3.5 starsWhen I picked David Searcy s collection of essays to read, I was intrigued by the title and this phrase from the publisher s description, his unique blend of affection and suspicion , which, as it turns out, is the perfect way to describe his style His subjects are at once eclectic and ordinary, casting insights on the odd and the everyday His spot on descriptions have an almost just landed on this planet feeling to them they are so keenly observed and minutely examined I could not pick [...]


  • It s a shame this book was written And it s a wonder it was ever published If you like essays by someone who appears to be writing while on acid, then this is for you Searcy occasionally, rarely, hits a high note and you feel connected to the writing.But everything is so washed out, lonely, misty, fuzzy in the distance, maybe I am here, maybe not, he likes a lot of commas, so the sentence runs on and on, and the original thought, a thought that might have been good, gets lost in some extended, e [...]


  • What a wonderful, beautifully written collection of essays I had never heard of David Searcy before, but after reading these essays I am entranced by his sentences and hold on language that I will be reading his other two books horror novels YES Nothing really takes place in these essays, but don t let that deter you Searcy could seriously write about a piece of cardboard and make it sound fascinating and make thoughtful reflections on it Searcy lives in Texas, so naturally many of the essays ta [...]


  • I was a tentative fan of Searcy s previous 2 novels, but definitely not a fan of those of his essays that I ve read, so I went into this book with some hesitation I was surprised by it being a really lovely compilation of autobiographical essays I might be a smidge biased a lot of the characters are people I know, in places I know.In very brief summary, as I m not a wordsmith rambling, reflective essays, often about growing up in Texas It feels a lot like Ray Bradbury s Dandelion Wine which is p [...]


  • This book took me awhile to finish It is not for the fainthearted It is thought provoking and you have to work with the author to get the full message from it He covers a vast area of thought with these essays, but you have to get used to the sudden change of topic before you get back to the main one The side travels are interesting also, you just have to get used to the style of writing Enjoyed it.J Robert Ewbank author John Wesley, Natural Man, and the Isms Wesley s Wars To Whom It May Concern [...]


  • You don t want afterthoughts for wings This book has some delightfully zany and enlightening essays and stories With witty anecdotes and exploration of what it means to be alive Some of the essays are dense or existential than others but the variety is an enjoyable read The book is wonderfully approachable and a nice read.


  • I have encountered Searcy s essays in magazines and enjoyed them, so I was glad to see this little collection of pieces ranging from observations on hunting coyote, Olivier s Henry V, pickups, West Texas, local gravestones, comic books, trees, eccentric people, landscape painting and maps Always beautifully written and interesting in their ability to link disparate things.


  • At his best, Searcy plunges beneath the surface of the everyday to find connections that are both precise and expansive At his worst, he meanders, but stays true to the spirit of Montaigne and, yes, Sebald nevertheless There s the odd hit of sentimentality childhood baseball, backyard opossums but the antidote of a low earth orbit view is always quickly applied.


  • I won Shame And Wonder Essays on First Reads Mr Searcy s book seemed a little erratic and hard to follow It took me a while to finish it There were parts of the book that I enjoyed, though.


  • Great in parts, self indulgent in others Strangely the jarring inconsistency of the collection kept me reading The pull of knowing the next essay might be one of the good ones just as often left me thrilled as disappointed.


  • An uneven collection of stories and essays based on the author s life Some of the essays were really good the ranch , but most were self centered and I found them quite boring.I received this book free from First Reads.


  • I didn t want this book to end While there were a couple of weak stories thus the 4 stars , many of the stories grabbed me in a deep and emotional way.I don t think it would appeal to everyone, but I loved it.



  • I won this book on.Some of the stories were hard to get into You really need to think about the meaning of each and stay focused Not a good book to read in a noisy area.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *